Family, Leadership, Personal Development, Uncategorized

How to Prioritize When Everything is Important

No such thing as not having enough timeDear Readers, I’ve been in the Northwest of Cambodia for the past few days teaching the director of our Center in Poipet City, Banteay Mean Chey Province, and his leadership team some of the lessons I’ve been teaching in Phnom Penh at my Cambodian Leadership Institute.  These guys are very far away and the level of knowledge in this Thai Border City is very low.  I’ve felt the urgency to do this for some time.

To learn more about this city you can take a look at the Wikipedia article here:  Poipet City, Cambodia.

We have an English School here and a kindergarten as well as many village activities.  People often tell me they want to see where I work and live, so here are a few photos from my phone:

I’m a person who manages multiple priorities, like you probably do, too.  But how is that actually done?  I have some thoughts of my own, but as I’m traveling and teaching this week I don’t have time to sort through them, so in my research I found the following site that I thought would be helpful to my readers.

In the following link is a post by Tatyana Sussex.  It was a helpful confirmation to me and hopefully will be to you too.

How to Prioritize Work When Everything is #1

If this is helpful to you pass it on!

Also, please leave your insights as to how you manage multiple priorities!

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Family, Leadership, Missions, Personal Development, Uncategorized

What Makes and Effective Executive?

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(Photo by Kaitlyn McCaul, Willamette Valley, Oregon)

by Peter Drucker

An effective executive does not need to be a leader in the sense that the term is now most commonly used. Harry Truman did not have one ounce of charisma, for example, yet he was among the most effective chief executives in U.S. history. Similarly, some of the best business and nonprofit CEOs I’ve worked with over a 65-year consulting career were not stereotypical leaders. They were all over the map in terms of their personalities, attitudes, values, strengths, and weaknesses. They ranged from extroverted to nearly reclusive, from easygoing to controlling, from generous to parsimonious.

What made them all effective is that they followed the same eight practices:

  • They asked, “What needs to be done?”
  • They asked, “What is right for the enterprise?”
  • They developed action plans.
  • They took responsibility for decisions.
  • They took responsibility for communicating.
  • They were focused on opportunities rather than problems.
  • They ran productive meetings.
  • They thought and said “we” rather than “I.”

The first two practices gave them the knowledge they needed. The next four helped them convert this knowledge into effective action. The last two ensured that the whole organization felt responsible and accountable.

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